ARAMAS@ 'SAKURA

These beautiful pictures of blossoming cherry trees by Taku Aramasa are wonderfully fresh and inventive. To those of us who admire Japanese culture but who live outside it these photographs also represent something we recognize as “Japanese.”They are gorgeous, exuberant but also fragile and thus a little sad. It is important that the subject is the cherry blossom, for admiring these blossoms is a national obsession. In Japan, every year at the expected time, maps are printed in newspapers, and discussion occurs on the weather stations of the national television channels about when the optimum moment for viewing these flowers is projected, as the blooms open earlier in the southern part of the country and gradually proceed northwards.

During the last period of military expansion from the 1930’s and ending, terribly in 1945, the ruling powers in Japan politicized the ancient Shinto practice. The Yasukuni shrine in Tokyo, mostly identified with the last World War, is essentially a monument to those soldiers who died for the country’s military ambitions. The cherry trees at Yasukuni are numerous and graceful, and symbolize the brief but beautiful life of those young soldiers who died in the service of their country’s dreams of power. Since the war, and certainly before it, the fragile and fleeting cherry blossom has been identified with Japanese culture in a larger sense; it reflects a cult of the beautiful, and a profound belief in nature as a relief from and explanation of complex change.

Aramasa’s pictures are made with a pinhole lens, that is, they are made with a tiny spot of light that enters the camera through a small hole, not a normal lens. This is the most basic, the most essential camera image and the phenomenon that led to the optical and chemical advances of modern photography. The ancients knew that a speck of light entering a dark room would render a vision of the scene outside on the opposite wall the shadowy figures of Plato’s cave may be such a description. This primitive methodology, however, has been used by a sophisticated artist, one who appreciates and emphasizes the inherent spatial distortions and the particularly crepuscular light such a lens provides. These qualities impart a sense of the magic, the spectral, even the ancient. They are also entirely, wonderfully unique.

Aramasa is a talented and knowing artist, whose main interest in photography has been to understand modern Japan as a country and a culture. Earlier, he photographed Japanese immigration: to China, to South America and to the United States. His pictures of the deserted internment camps where Japanese Americans lived through the past World War are photographs of great integrity and humanity. More recently he has made pictures examining the Japanese shoreline. These pictures of the ancient ritual of the Japanese: looking at and admiring the annual display nature provides, are another form of inquiry into Japanese culture, ancient and modern.

Sandra S, Phillips is
the Senior Curator of Photography at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art.

ARAMAS@ 'SAKURA

 新正卓による、これら一連の美しい桜の写真は、じつに新鮮で創意に富んだものである。日本文化を敬愛しながらも外国に住んでいる私たちのような人間にとって、これらの写真は、私たちが「日本」であると認識しているものを象徴している。これらの写真の中の桜は華麗で生命力にあふれているが、もろくまたどことなくもの哀しい。主題が桜の花である、ということは大変重要な事である。それというのも桜の花を大事にするのは、日本国民の強迫観念(妄念)でもあるからだ。日本では毎年、桜の開花が近づくと、新聞には開花した場所の地図が載り、全国ネットのテレビ局の番組では、天気予報のコーナーの中で、必ず桜が話題に上り、南から開花して徐々に北上するにつれて、いつが花の見ごろなのかが注目される。

 1930年代から1945年、ようやくの終結までの軍拡の時代、日本の支配階級は古代の神道を政治の道具とした。東京にある靖国神社はその大戦で有名になったが、国の軍事的野心に殉じた兵士達にとっては必要不可欠な記念碑だった。靖国神社のさくらは、豊潤で優美だが、国家の権力への夢に奉仕して死んだ若い兵士達の短くも美しい人生を象徴しているのである。

 戦争以来、いや、それ以前から、もろくはかない桜の花は広い意味で日本文化であると見なされてきた。それは、複雑な変化に対する解説や、そこからの解放としての美への礼賛や自然への深い信仰を反映したものなのである。

 新正の写真はピンホールレンズによって制作されている。それは通常のレンズとは違い小さな穴を通ってカメラの中に入る光の小さな光源によって作り出されるのである。最も基本的で原初的なカメラの映像であり、現代写真へと発達する光学や科学へと繋がる現象である。先人達はこの光の点が暗い部屋の中で、反対側の壁に外の光景を出現させることを知っていた。プラトンの洞窟の影の姿はそのような表現であるかもしれない。この原初的な方法論はしかし、ピンホールに固有の空間的なゆがみや、その光のほの暗さを評価し強調する、洗練されたアーティスト達によって使われてきた。

 さらに特徴として魔法のような感覚や亡霊のような感覚をともなう、先人達には特にそのような印象が強かったことであろう。全体的であるうえに非常に個性的でもある。

 新正は才能に恵まれた著名な芸術家である。彼の写真における興味は主に、国として文化としての現代日本を理解しようとする事におかれている。以前の作品では中国、南アメリカ、アメリカ合衆国へと渡った日本の初期移民を撮影した。先の大戦中日系アメリカ人が生活していた、今は寂れた居留地の写真は、誠実さや人間性を現している。

 近作では日本の海岸線を撮影した写真を制作している。これらの写真は、毎年繰り広げられる自然の恩恵を、じっと見つめ、敬意を払うという日本の古来からの儀式にのっとった写真なのであり、同時に、日本文化に対して、過去と現代に対して、別の形で質問を呈しようとしている。

サンドラ・S・フィリップス
San Francisco Museum of Modern Art

主任キュレーター